“As you are falling, your sense of orientation may start to play additional tricks on you. The horizon quivers in a maze of collapsing lines and you may lose any sense of above and below, of before and after, of yourself and your boundaries”

—Hito Steyerl, In Free Fall: A Thought Experiment on Vertical Perspective

Resemblance

Halie Finney and Dwayne Martineau

Curated by Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective

Resemblance


Grief can be a completely consuming and ubiquitous feeling; a complex space that we embody. These spaces and moments can be difficult to articulate, leaving us vulnerable, searching for memories and familiarities shared with those who have passed. We hold onto something: the presence of what was lost seeking it within land or objects, to fill the absence in our lives. Mapping our memories and grief onto familiar objects and landscapes, our memories are engraved into what remains, connecting us to our lost loved ones.

Resemblance, features the work of Halie Finney and Dwayne Martineau, and explores death and grief through narratives about land by projecting sought-after memories onto surrounding objects and experiences. The ways in which we mourn shapes and generates how we move forward. Both artists question the unknown afterlife as they are caught within an ethereal state of mourning and memories. Our grief and mourning are often present in “experiences within space and can be triggered and ameliorated in relation to particular places at particular times” Our world changes or adapts in relation to our loss, projecting our lived relationship onto familiar spaces that provoke our memories. Layering and projecting their interpretations and experiences of death and grief, the artists invite us into an inter-relational space to honour the mourning process.

ONE DEAD TREE #4, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

ONE DEAD TREE #9, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

Halie Finney’s animation, Story of a (almost) dead dog (2018follows the story of a dog who digs a deep hole which he falls into, passing into the afterlife. We watch as the dog cries and whimpers for his mother as ghosts pass by him. Finney creates distinctive illustrative characters, creating her own folklore, and developing stories within the media of  installation, film and performance. She creates her narratives using characters to depict memories, taking elements from the memories she has of people and places from her home community in Northern Alberta. The dog, or ghost dog, often plays an active role in her work, shifting between afterlife and life; this playful companion balances between opposing  states of existence, representing both the loss of a loved one and  their ghostly reminders in our daily life. Finney states:



Dogs have always been members in my family and as someone who grew up in a rural area next to a highway, they have also taught me the most about death and grieving. In this project, the dog character fully steps into his role as a figure that goes in-between worlds, perhaps it is his origin story. In making this video, I have learned that there is no resolve to mourning; the harder I try to get away from the ghosts of who I love, the closer they come, reminding me that I will see them again.

ONE DEAD TREE #5, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

The considered shift between the unknown and known, the mystical and intelligible, plays a role in both Finney and Martineau’s work . The ways in which we depict our understanding of death is not without entering into the ambiguous notions of afterlife. Each of the artworks have a magical element, leaving the viewer to interpret their own relationship with death and the unknown. While death and the act of mourning remain haunting and ghostly in their ambiguous nature, beautiful elements of love, memories and familiarity are within our tangible reach.

Dwayne Martineau’s work One Dead Tree (2012), is a series of experimental images of a dead tree found in a familiar walking path in Edmonton’s ravine. A repeated image of the tree is layered to create ghostly reflections, serving as a manipulation of itself within the image. The stacking of negatives of one dead tree creates a series of symmetrical images produced by light. The tree appears as a diseased bone, situated within an environment of what continues to grow around it. The images take on a mystical exploration of the unknown,  existing within the mourning, ghostly and magical interventions of our own personal experiences. Martineau often explores the mystical elements of nature, including life and death, asymmetry and symmetry, and the manipulation of perception in-camera through layering, to create a new way of seeing and understanding our natural world. Martineau states, of One Dead Tree:



At the time, my perception was being filtered by intense feelings about the imminent death of a close friend. Where I would normally seek majesty, I was finding fear, decay, and confused beauty.

ONE DEAD TREE #14, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

ONE DEAD TREE #15, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

Both artists play with the construction of the image by using a series of transparent layers built one upon another to form a narrative controlled using light. Finney authors her work by moving her transparencies, building the story by adding and retracting imagery and using the opaque and translucent qualities of animation.  Martineau’s multiple images of a singular tree over top of each other create a complex and mystical exploration of the intricate relationship between it and his memories and loss.  Neither work can be perceived within a singular view; by spending time with the repeated images, a depth of meaning can be understood over time. The playful use of light and transparency become the artists’ material of exploration into their understandings of mourning processes. Both artists explore familiar memories or objects to link them to their lost ones, creating complex narratives that explore the afterlife and the absence of their loved ones, layering presence in land, object and memory.

ONE DEAD TREE #18, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

Story of a (almost) Dead Dog, June 2018

Halie Finney
Video (overhead projector, acrylic paints and inks, stop-motion animation) 
13:00  min

Through light, Finney and Martineau are able to create distinct narratives within their respective practices. The physicality of light and projection gives legacy to a lived experience of loss, and serves as an invitation to witness a vulnerable state of mourning. Projecting our grief onto our surroundings, we find ourselves looking for answers during our vulnerable states of mourning. Those who have passed still live on in our collective memories and in the narratives,  we build to honour them. As memory keepers, we continue the legacy of lived experiences and loss.

Halie Finney is an emerging artist currently based in Edmonton, Alberta. She received her degree from the Alberta University of Art and Design in 2017 where she majored in drawing; she also graduated from MacEwan University in 2014 with a diploma in fine arts.



Born and raised in the Lesser Slave Lake region of Alberta, Halie holds a strong connection to the area. She understands her Métis heritage through memories told to her by generations of her family who still reside there and through the unchanged characteristics of her home's landscape and lifestyle.


In order to speak about home and family freely Halie has created a mythology of characters living in a simplified storybook reflection of her hometown. The group of characters plays out non-linear, idiosyncratic narratives that are expressed through animations, costumes, drawings, paintings, performances and other objects. 



Dwayne Martineau is a visual artist, musician and composer living in Edmonton. Two preoccupations dominate his work— the physicality of light, and experimental landscape photography. Using optics, found glass, mirrors and multiple exposures, Martineau introduces distortions, symmetries, and animism into exhaustive studies of forests and trees. His goal, as he describes it, is to use the unique power of photography to "give us a chance to see nature through a different lens, literally, and understand that it’s got its own thing going on..." Dwayne is a member of the Frog Lake First Nation, descended from a complex frontier mix of early French, Scottish and Irish settlers, Plains Cree, Métis, and Iroquois.

Based in the region of Edmonton, Alberta, Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective supports the work of Indigenous contemporary artists and designers and engages in contemporary critical dialogue, valuing artistic collaboration and fostering awareness of Indigenous contemporary art practices.



In March 2020, Ociciwan will be opening a contemporary Indigenous arts centre in Edmonton, Alberta. The gallery will host 4 exhibitions a year dedicated to Indigenous contemporary art practices.  The goal of the centre is to create a venue to present Indigenous contemporary art in Edmonton year round and to serve as a place for experimental creative practices and innovative research.

Resemblance

Halie Finney and Dwayne Martineau

Curated by Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective

Resemblance


Grief can be a completely consuming and ubiquitous feeling; a complex space that we embody. These spaces and moments can be difficult to articulate, leaving us vulnerable, searching for memories and familiarities shared with those who have passed. We hold onto something: the presence of what was lost seeking it within land or objects, to fill the absence in our lives. Mapping our memories and grief onto familiar objects and landscapes, our memories are engraved into what remains, connecting us to our lost loved ones.

Resemblance, features the work of Halie Finney and Dwayne Martineau, and explores death and grief through narratives about land by projecting sought-after memories onto surrounding objects and experiences. The ways in which we mourn shapes and generates how we move forward. Both artists question the unknown afterlife as they are caught within an ethereal state of mourning and memories. Our grief and mourning are often present in “experiences within space and can be triggered and ameliorated in relation to particular places at particular times” Our world changes or adapts in relation to our loss, projecting our lived relationship onto familiar spaces that provoke our memories. Layering and projecting their interpretations and experiences of death and grief, the artists invite us into an inter-relational space to honour the mourning process.

ONE DEAD TREE #4, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

ONE DEAD TREE #9, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

Halie Finney’s animation, Story of a (almost) dead dog (2018follows the story of a dog who digs a deep hole which he falls into, passing into the afterlife. We watch as the dog cries and whimpers for his mother as ghosts pass by him. Finney creates distinctive illustrative characters, creating her own folklore, and developing stories within the media of  installation, film and performance. She creates her narratives using characters to depict memories, taking elements from the memories she has of people and places from her home community in Northern Alberta. The dog, or ghost dog, often plays an active role in her work, shifting between afterlife and life; this playful companion balances between opposing  states of existence, representing both the loss of a loved one and  their ghostly reminders in our daily life. Finney states:



Dogs have always been members in my family and as someone who grew up in a rural area next to a highway, they have also taught me the most about death and grieving. In this project, the dog character fully steps into his role as a figure that goes in-between worlds, perhaps it is his origin story. In making this video, I have learned that there is no resolve to mourning; the harder I try to get away from the ghosts of who I love, the closer they come, reminding me that I will see them again.

ONE DEAD TREE #5, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

The considered shift between the unknown and known, the mystical and intelligible, plays a role in both Finney and Martineau’s work . The ways in which we depict our understanding of death is not without entering into the ambiguous notions of afterlife. Each of the artworks have a magical element, leaving the viewer to interpret their own relationship with death and the unknown. While death and the act of mourning remain haunting and ghostly in their ambiguous nature, beautiful elements of love, memories and familiarity are within our tangible reach.

Dwayne Martineau’s work One Dead Tree (2012), is a series of experimental images of a dead tree found in a familiar walking path in Edmonton’s ravine. A repeated image of the tree is layered to create ghostly reflections, serving as a manipulation of itself within the image. The stacking of negatives of one dead tree creates a series of symmetrical images produced by light. The tree appears as a diseased bone, situated within an environment of what continues to grow around it. The images take on a mystical exploration of the unknown,  existing within the mourning, ghostly and magical interventions of our own personal experiences. Martineau often explores the mystical elements of nature, including life and death, asymmetry and symmetry, and the manipulation of perception in-camera through layering, to create a new way of seeing and understanding our natural world. Martineau states, of One Dead Tree:



At the time, my perception was being filtered by intense feelings about the imminent death of a close friend. Where I would normally seek majesty, I was finding fear, decay, and confused beauty.

ONE DEAD TREE #14, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

ONE DEAD TREE #15, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

Both artists play with the construction of the image by using a series of transparent layers built one upon another to form a narrative controlled using light. Finney authors her work by moving her transparencies, building the story by adding and retracting imagery and using the opaque and translucent qualities of animation.  Martineau’s multiple images of a singular tree over top of each other create a complex and mystical exploration of the intricate relationship between it and his memories and loss.  Neither work can be perceived within a singular view; by spending time with the repeated images, a depth of meaning can be understood over time. The playful use of light and transparency become the artists’ material of exploration into their understandings of mourning processes. Both artists explore familiar memories or objects to link them to their lost ones, creating complex narratives that explore the afterlife and the absence of their loved ones, layering presence in land, object and memory.

ONE DEAD TREE #18, June 2012
Dwayne Martineau
Photo rag paper carriage-bolted to
OSB board
34.5 x 23.5 inches

Story of a (almost) Dead Dog, June 2018

Halie Finney
Video (overhead projector, acrylic paints and inks, stop-motion animation) 
13:00  min

Through light, Finney and Martineau are able to create distinct narratives within their respective practices. The physicality of light and projection gives legacy to a lived experience of loss, and serves as an invitation to witness a vulnerable state of mourning. Projecting our grief onto our surroundings, we find ourselves looking for answers during our vulnerable states of mourning. Those who have passed still live on in our collective memories and in the narratives,  we build to honour them. As memory keepers, we continue the legacy of lived experiences and loss.

Halie Finney is an emerging artist currently based in Edmonton, Alberta. She received her degree from the Alberta University of Art and Design in 2017 where she majored in drawing; she also graduated from MacEwan University in 2014 with a diploma in fine arts.



Born and raised in the Lesser Slave Lake region of Alberta, Halie holds a strong connection to the area. She understands her Métis heritage through memories told to her by generations of her family who still reside there and through the unchanged characteristics of her home's landscape and lifestyle.


In order to speak about home and family freely Halie has created a mythology of characters living in a simplified storybook reflection of her hometown. The group of characters plays out non-linear, idiosyncratic narratives that are expressed through animations, costumes, drawings, paintings, performances and other objects. 



Dwayne Martineau is a visual artist, musician and composer living in Edmonton. Two preoccupations dominate his work— the physicality of light, and experimental landscape photography. Using optics, found glass, mirrors and multiple exposures, Martineau introduces distortions, symmetries, and animism into exhaustive studies of forests and trees. His goal, as he describes it, is to use the unique power of photography to "give us a chance to see nature through a different lens, literally, and understand that it’s got its own thing going on..." Dwayne is a member of the Frog Lake First Nation, descended from a complex frontier mix of early French, Scottish and Irish settlers, Plains Cree, Métis, and Iroquois.

Based in the region of Edmonton, Alberta, Ociciwan Contemporary Art Collective supports the work of Indigenous contemporary artists and designers and engages in contemporary critical dialogue, valuing artistic collaboration and fostering awareness of Indigenous contemporary art practices.



In March 2020, Ociciwan will be opening a contemporary Indigenous arts centre in Edmonton, Alberta. The gallery will host 4 exhibitions a year dedicated to Indigenous contemporary art practices.  The goal of the centre is to create a venue to present Indigenous contemporary art in Edmonton year round and to serve as a place for experimental creative practices and innovative research.